E-cigarettes are 15% more likely to help smokers quit

Smokers who also use e-cigarettes are more likely to kick the habit, a new research reveals.

Some 65 per cent of vapers attempt to quit smoking versus 40 percent of non-e-cigarette users, according to the largest study of its kind.

Vaping also increases a wannabe-quitter’s chance of success, with eight percent successfully abstaining from cigarettes for at least three months compared to five per cent of traditional smokers, the research adds. 

Peter Hajek, director of the health and lifestyle research unit at Queen Mary University, who was not involved in the study, said: ‘It’s absolutely clear that e-cigarettes help smokers replace cigarettes.’

Yet, Dr Aruni Bhatnagar, director of the American Heart Association’s Tobacco Research and Addiction Center, added: ‘We just don’t know if moving to e-cigarettes is good enough to reduce the harm.’

Smokers who also use e-cigarettes are more likely to kick the habit, a new research reveals

Smokers who also use e-cigarettes are more likely to kick the habit, a new research reveals

Smokers who also use e-cigarettes are more likely to kick the habit, a new research reveals

E-CIGARETTES ARE LESS ADDICTIVE: VAPERS ARE NOT AS DEPENDENT ON THEIR HABIT  

E-cigarettes are less addictive as vapers are not as dependent on their habit as traditional smokers, research revealed last month.

Vapers typically wait longer to start using their e-cigs after waking up, a study found.

They are also less likely to consider themselves addicts or have strong cravings, the research adds.

E-cig users also report finding it easier to refrain from their habit when in no-vaping areas, the study found.

Study author Professor Guodong Liu from Penn State College of Medicine, said: ‘No doubt about it, e-cigarettes are addictive, but not at the same level as traditional cigarettes.’ 

How the study was carried out 

Researchers from the University of California in San Diego analyzed data collected by the US Census from 2001 to 2015. 

E-cigarette users were identified from the most recent survey, while smoking quit rates were obtained from those who had reported smoking cigarettes 12 months before the survey.

The outcomes were compared to four earlier surveys.

Key findings  

The results revealed that 65 per cent of vapers try to quit smoking versus 40 per cent of non-users.

Some eight per cent of vapers successfully abstain from smoking for at least three months compared to five per cent of traditional smokers.

The findings were published in the journal BMJ.  

‘E-cigarettes help smokers replace cigarettes’ 

Mr Hajek said: ‘It’s absolutely clear that e-cigarettes help smokers replace cigarettes.’

He added that vaping devices should not be strictly regulated: ‘That way, smokers can get what they want without killing themselves.’

Earlier this month, a House panel renewed its efforts to prevent the Food and Drug Administration from requiring safety reviews of e-cigarettes already on the market.

Christopher Bullen, professor of public health at the University of Auckland, said that any ill effects of e-cigarettes are ‘likely to be rare compared with the harms of continuing to smoke. 

‘If every smoker was to change over to e-cigarettes completely, there would be a dramatic and almost immediate public health benefit.’  

Yet, others warn the long-term side effects of e-cigarettes are unknown.

Dr Bhatnagar said: ‘We just don’t know if moving to e-cigarettes is good enough to reduce the harm.’

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