Matthew Ellis, a Texas State University pledge, died at his fraternity


Texas State
The
death at Texas State is the second such death of at a college
fraternity in a month, and the fourth this
year.


Texas
State Facebook



  • A 20-year-old Texas State University fraternity pledge
    died Monday.
  • Texas State suspended all Greek organization
    activities.
  • It is the fourth fraternity pledge to die in
    2017.


Texas State University on Tuesday suspended the
activities of all Greek organizations following the death of
a pledge — the second such death at a college fraternity in a
month, and the fourth this year. 

Matthew Ellis, 20, died on November 13 following an
initiation into his fraternity, Phi Kappa Psi, The University Star
reported.
An investigation is currently underway, but
preliminary findings indicated that alcohol may have played a
role in his death.

Texas State President Denise Trauth emailed the
community following Ellis’ death, announcing the suspension of
all Greek activities pending a review.

“As a result of this tragedy, I have suspended activities of all
Greek fraternity and sorority chapters at Texas State,” Trauth
wrote, according to The University Star. “These chapters are
prohibited from holding new-member events, chapter meetings,
social functions and philanthropic activities until a thorough
review of the Greek Affairs system is completed.”

The scene appears all too familiar. Earlier in November,
Florida State University

indefinitely suspended the activities of all
Greek organizations following the death of a
pledge and the arrest of a fraternity member on charges of drug
trafficking.

In September, a Louisiana State University freshman
named Maxwell
Gruver
, 18, died after participating in a fraternity hazing
game where he had to drink alcohol when he answered a question
incorrectly, The New York Times reported.

And after a Penn State sophomore
named Timothy
Piazza
, 19, died in February after a fraternity hazing event,
university officials suspended fraternities and sororities from
holding social activities during the spring semester. The Penn
State Board of Trustees also passed a package of new rules
designed to change Greek life. 

If you’re part of a Greek organization on a US college campus
and have something to share, contact
ajackson@businessinsider.com

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