Oxford University students enjoy ‘trashing’ celebration

Oxford University students have celebrated the end of their exams in the only way they know how – by covering each other in foam and silly string as they chug bottle after bottle of bubbly. 

Final-years were seen pouring out of exam halls as they began the annual end-of-term booze-up.

The tradition, known as ‘trashing’, sees students spray each other with Champagne, flour and confetti in one last blow-out before they leave the world of academia.

It started in the 1990s and sees friends of students taking their finals wait outside the back of the Examination Schools in Oxford city centre.

As their chums emerge, they blast them with silly string and shaving foam before plying each other with alcohol – usually Champagne.

Oxford University students have celebrated the end of their exams in the only way they know how - by covering each other in foam and silly string as they chug bottle after bottle of bubbly

Oxford University students have celebrated the end of their exams in the only way they know how - by covering each other in foam and silly string as they chug bottle after bottle of bubbly

Two of the students share a kiss after finishing their exams

Two of the students share a kiss after finishing their exams

Oxford University students have celebrated the end of their exams in the only way they know how – by covering each other in foam and silly string as they chug bottle after bottle of bubbly

Students take part in 'trashing' at the end of their exams at Oxford University, where fellow students shower them in champagne, party string and foam

Students take part in 'trashing' at the end of their exams at Oxford University, where fellow students shower them in champagne, party string and foam

Students take part in ‘trashing’ at the end of their exams at Oxford University, where fellow students shower them in champagne, party string and foam

One student is absolutely caked in flour and bubbly shortly after finishing her final year exams at the world renowned Oxford University

One student is absolutely caked in flour and bubbly shortly after finishing her final year exams at the world renowned Oxford University

One student is absolutely caked in flour and bubbly shortly after finishing her final year exams at the world renowned Oxford University

As well as party string and shaving foam, the students are covered in confetti - making it a big clear up job in the afternoon

As well as party string and shaving foam, the students are covered in confetti - making it a big clear up job in the afternoon

As well as party string and shaving foam, the students are covered in confetti – making it a big clear up job in the afternoon

One student shields his eyes as those in the crowd, which is made up of family members and fellow students, bombard them with confetti and foam

One student shields his eyes as those in the crowd, which is made up of family members and fellow students, bombard them with confetti and foam

One student shields his eyes as those in the crowd, which is made up of family members and fellow students, bombard them with confetti and foam

One student happily necks a bottle of Champagne as he dons a tiara and oversized glasses, while a friend offers him a sip of WKD Blue

One student happily necks a bottle of Champagne as he dons a tiara and oversized glasses, while a friend offers him a sip of WKD Blue

One student happily necks a bottle of Champagne as he dons a tiara and oversized glasses, while a friend offers him a sip of WKD Blue

The hi-jinks have caused controversy over the years, with university officials trying to step in to put an end to the fun. 

The tradition of ‘trashing’ has endured despite successive attempts by the proctors of Oxford to clamp down on it and even impose fines.

The tradition started in the 1990s, a few years after Prime Minister David Cameron, Chancellor George Osborne, Home Secretary Theresa May, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and former Mayor of London Boris Johnson all graduated. 

Currently 26 per cent of MPs have a degree from Oxford or Cambridge, half the Cabinet have an Oxbridge degree and 50 per cent went to private schools.

The high jinks of trashing have caused controversy over the years.

Four years ago the celebrations were described by university proctors as ‘a disgrace’, after students left behind rotten food, vomit and broken glass.

One student can't hide her delight at finishing her exams

One student can't hide her delight at finishing her exams

It started in the 1990s and sees friends of students taking their finals wait outside the back of the Examination Schools in Oxford city centre

It started in the 1990s and sees friends of students taking their finals wait outside the back of the Examination Schools in Oxford city centre

The tradition started in the 1990s and sees friends of students taking their finals wait outside the back of the Examination Schools in Oxford city centre

The tradition, known as 'trashing', sees students spray each other with Champagne, flour and confetti in one last blow-out before they leave the world of academia

The tradition, known as 'trashing', sees students spray each other with Champagne, flour and confetti in one last blow-out before they leave the world of academia

The tradition, known as ‘trashing’, sees students spray each other with Champagne, flour and confetti in one last blow-out before they leave the world of academia

As their chums emerge, they blast them with silly string and shaving foam before plying each other with alcohol - usually Champagne

As their chums emerge, they blast them with silly string and shaving foam before plying each other with alcohol - usually Champagne

One girl hold on to a bouquet of flowers

One girl hold on to a bouquet of flowers

As their chums emerge, they blast them with silly string and shaving foam before plying each other with alcohol – usually Champagne

The hi-jinks have caused controversy over the years, with university officials trying to step in to put an end to the fun

The hi-jinks have caused controversy over the years, with university officials trying to step in to put an end to the fun

The hi-jinks have caused controversy over the years, with university officials trying to step in to put an end to the fun

It is nigh on impossible for students to escape being caught up in the melee because of the colour of the flower they wear on their gown, given that red signifies it is their finals

It is nigh on impossible for students to escape being caught up in the melee because of the colour of the flower they wear on their gown, given that red signifies it is their finals

Exam-goers are expected to wear a white carnation for their first test, a red one for their final exam, and pink for all in between

Exam-goers are expected to wear a white carnation for their first test, a red one for their final exam, and pink for all in between

It is nigh on impossible for students to escape being caught up in the melee because of the colour of the flower they wear on their gown, given that red signifies it is their finals

It followed a report of a female student being fined £80 for being caught rubbing a trifle in a friend’s face. She was told she had to pay the fee or she would not be allowed to graduate.

It is nigh on impossible for students to escape being caught up in the melee because of the colour of the flower they wear on their gown.

Exam-goers are expected to wear a white carnation for their first test, a red one for their final exam, and pink for all in between.

The flower is worn on each student’s black coat – part of the ceremonial attire known as sub fusc which must be worn during exams.

In 2015, Oxford University Students’ Union voted overwhelmingly in favour of keeping the centuries-old tradition of wearing gowns, suits and mortarboards to exams.

Some students had argued that the formal dress is ‘medieval’, claiming it contributes to the perception of the university as ‘elitist’ and ‘unwelcoming’.

But in a referendum 75 per cent voted to keep the signature sartorial look for exams.

The tradition of 'trashing' has endured despite successive attempts by the proctors of Oxford to clamp down on it and even impose fines

The tradition of 'trashing' has endured despite successive attempts by the proctors of Oxford to clamp down on it and even impose fines

The tradition of ‘trashing’ has endured despite successive attempts by the proctors of Oxford to clamp down on it and even impose fines

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