Study shows majority of women’s college coaches are white, male

Nearly 88 percent of head coaches of women’s college teams are white, and nearly 57 percent of them are men, according to a study of eight major American collegiate sports conferences released Friday on the 45th anniversary of Title IX becoming law.

The study showed 7 percent of coaches of women’s teams were black, 2.8 percent were Latino, 2.2 percent were Asian and less than 1 percent were Hawaiian/Pacific Islander.

Only the American Athletic Conference received a grade higher than a C for diversity — getting a B with 18.2 percent of its women’s teams coached by people of color.

The Pac-12, ACC and Big 12 all earned C’s, while the Big East, SEC, Big Ten and Ivy League all received F grades for having less than 11 percent minority representation among head coaches.

Clemson was the top school, with 55 percent of its women’s teams led by head coaches of color. Arizona was next at 50 percent. Temple and TCU were the only others to top 40 percent.

The overall percentage of women coaching women’s teams in the conferences studied was 43.1 percent, according to numbers compiled by the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport.

The Ivy League had 55 percent of women’s head coaches for women’s teams, the highest in the study. The AAC, Pac-12, Big Ten and ACC all topped 40 percent. The Big 12 was last with 32 percent. The numbers are consistent with previous reports, suggesting that growth in the number of women in top coaching jobs has stagnated, according to researchers.

Cincinnati and UCF both had 80 percent of their women’s teams coached by women. Princeton had more than 70 percent.

Seven schools earned a gold medallion in SportSafe’s LGBT rankings for inclusion — Nebraska, Northwestern, Oregon, North Carolina, Temple, UCLA and USC. California-Berkeley earned a silver medallion.

The study was co-produced by LGBT SportSafe, The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida, and the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport at the University of Minnesota. It included the ACC, Big 12, Big East, Big Ten, Pac-12, SEC, American and Ivy League. Each conference was assigned a grade for race and gender inclusion, with recognition included for LGBT inclusion practices at individual institutions.

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