University give people ketamine and fentanyl for study

An elite university is looking for people to give recreational drugs to in a clinical trial – but not everyone can apply.

Monash University, one of Australia’s oldest educational institutions, is offering students a chance to be part of a trial involving ketamine, fentanyl and other opioids.

There are a number of requirements, including age, allergy and no prior substance abuse problems.

Monash University, one of Australia's oldest educational institutions, is offering students a chance to be part of a trial involving ketamine, fentanyl and other opioids 

Monash University, one of Australia's oldest educational institutions, is offering students a chance to be part of a trial involving ketamine, fentanyl and other opioids 

Monash University, one of Australia’s oldest educational institutions, is offering students a chance to be part of a trial involving ketamine, fentanyl and other opioids 

There are a number of requirements, including age, allergy and no prior substance abuse problems

There are a number of requirements, including age, allergy and no prior substance abuse problems

There are a number of requirements, including age, allergy and no prior substance abuse problems

The study is being conducted by Monash University’s Health department and Swinburne University, and is only available to students of the two colleges.

‘Monash Health and Swinburne University would like to invite you to participate in a research study to test the effect Ketamine in combination with either Fentanyl or Dexmedetomidine on cognition and neurobehaviour, as well as sedation and alertness,’ the notice reads.

‘The doses of Ketamine, Fentanyl and Dexmedetomidine used in this study are comparable to those used for pain relief (analgesia) in clinical (hospital) settings.’

The drugs are currently used by Victorian paramedics to treat pain relief.  

To be eligible, students must be between 21 and 45-years-old, have a full driver’s license and no allergic reactions to any of the drugs used.

'The doses of Ketamine, Fentanyl and Dexmedetomidine used in this study are comparable to those used for pain relief (analgesia) in clinical (hospital) settings'

'The doses of Ketamine, Fentanyl and Dexmedetomidine used in this study are comparable to those used for pain relief (analgesia) in clinical (hospital) settings'

‘The doses of Ketamine, Fentanyl and Dexmedetomidine used in this study are comparable to those used for pain relief (analgesia) in clinical (hospital) settings’

Participators must also have no history of relevant physical and neurological conditions, no history of severe psychiatric or cardiac disorders and not be pregnant.

The testing session will last eight hours, including a three-hour Ketamine infusion via an intravenous drip, and either a 90 minute period of three IV injections of Fentanyl or a 90 minute IV infusion of Dexemdetomidine.

The patient will then undergo takes to test their cognitive and driving abilities, sedation level and levels of alertness.

Anyone that participates will be paid for their time.

Daily Mail Australia contacted Monash University who confirmed the trial but declined to comment until the study was completed. 

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